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medium overload

During my lunch break on Wednesday, I was browsing through my Facebook feed, texting a friend, and emailing some final details about the Creative Economy Alderman debate that was to take place that evening. I realized that the text I was typing, the email I was sending, and the Facebook post I was responding to were all to the same person.  I then sent him another text message stating, “Kind of sad that I just emailed you, am texting you, and we’re posting to each other on Facebook.  Add a phone call and a tweet, and this would really be crazy.” I am sure many of you reading this already think that this is crazy, but I was using these mediums wearing three different hats, if you will, and conveying very different messages. This still may seem a little intense, but we need to take a step back and think about how these mediums are best used.

In this scenario, I was using Facebook to share an online article with my friend, texting to talk personally about a pressing issue, and emailing to talk “official business” and pass on some documents. I therefore was using all of these mediums for different reasons.  If I tweeted to him and called him, the tweet would have been something relevant (reposting a tweet or article I thought he would find interesting, for example, or commenting on a personal joke, perhaps) and a phone call would have been in a desperate “I need to talk to you right now!” panic. All of the modes of communication certainly have their different and intended purposes, but how do you not go into medium overload?

I don’t know that I can answer that question from a personal standpoint. From a business standpoint, I think it is pretty straightforward. You have to think about who your audience is and how they are using these different mediums, if they are, which will then instruct you on how to best use them.

I went to Google Ad Planner and looked up the demographics for the people that land on either Facebook.com or Twitter.com (see below).

Facebook.com

Demographics of Facebook.com.

Demographics from Twitter.com.

This is all well and good, but a lot of people don’t ever need to log in, either because they mainly use one site or the other on their phone and therefore don’t visit the home page of the site, or their computer remembers their log in and keeps it current.  However, Google Ad Planner is a great tool; you should certainly check it out when you plan to buy ads online.

Using a social media communications dashboard, like Hootsuite (which I use) allows you to get demographic information from your different social media sites at once. Different insights from Hootsuite or the individual site allow you to even see the best time to post information on your pages. Knowing which tools are best for you to use takes research and time. You need to know your market and where your competitors are, as well.  You also need to keep in mind that this information changes all of the time. For example, I can not find any more recent information on the average age of the Facebook user than from 2010 when it was 38.  Of course, I could do some mathematical equations based on the percentages on the graphics above, but I am not a math wiz; I am a social media wiz.

My point being is that each mode of communication that you use and is available to you has a different purpose.  The way that you use these mediums, as well, can vary from business to business or person to person.  You need to build all modes of communication into your marketing plan; including everything from more traditional mailers and phone-a-thons, to social media and email blasts. And although there are more methods of communication and interaction now, please don’t go into media overload. Study your demographics and who your target customer is.  Find out where they are and place your self in front of them not only on social media platforms, but on websites they frequent, other businesses they are patrons of, and the public transportation they use. By knowing who your customer is and how they use their free time and work time,  you will be able to reach them more effectively and efficiently.

Before I go, in my research today, I found this great graphic from Advertising Age online. It delves into the demographics even further.

From Adage.com.


 
 

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Vermont: Post-Irene

I am sitting at 34 Strongs Avenue, Restoring Rutland “HQ,” as we coordinators have so lovingly called it, and I can’t help but get a little sad. It is surreal for me to sit here and think about the whirlwind experience I have had in the past 14 days. I do not know if I fully understand what has happened here or how it happened.

 

The first day we were open, my friend Alexis Voutas was here even before I was, and when we received our first bag of donations, she looked at me and said, “What are we going to do with this stuff?” I looked at her and replied, “You know, I’m not sure. But I am really not worried about it.” She was a lot more worried than I was, and now, looking back over the week, I am surprised that everything worked out as well as it did. Everything fell into place. The minute we said that we were here to help, those who needed help and those who wanted to help, reached out to us. There was no emergency plan in place. There was not too much prior knowledge of who to call or what to do. The amazing thing is, we worked together with firefighters, towns, volunteers; all around amazing people and this marvelous movement occurred.

 

I have been working with the Creative Economy for over a year and a half. I have seen and heard many people talk about a lack of a sense of community from the smallest towns in our county, to the largest ones. And not just within a community, but a sense of community between these towns has also been criticized for missing. I have seen the struggles that each town is faced with and it sometimes surprises me that so many people in these areas either are not aware of or do not care about what is going on in their home town. Comparing “pre-Irene” Vermont to “post-Irene” Vermont is astounding. Vermont is very much a community oriented state, but I think over the past few years, we somehow lost ourselves and had been extremely lucky to not have experienced devastation this great. I am not trying to be cliché and say that a horrible event can drive people together to do what they normally would not. I am saying that Vermont needed to find our way back to who we are. Vermonters as individuals helping individuals has always been a way of life. We needed to get back to communities helping themselves and each other. Though I would never wish Irene or any further devastation on my wonderful state or country to occur again, what comes out of that devastation illustrates the character of those affected.

 

It is quite obvious by now that I am pro-Vermont and pro-community. I have seen what communities are capable of within themselves, and what they can offer to others. I hope that as roads get reconstructed, businesses open back up, and homes are rebuilt, that we do not lose this great sense of a statewide Vermont community. I so often say that I am thankful to be a Vermonter, and I truly believe that I always will be. I am so proud of my little Vermont, that we have proven to the nation; no, the world, that we are strong.

 

We are not easily scared.

We can overcome any obstacle.

We can work through our tears and continue to laugh.

We are strong.

We are Vermont strong.

 

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Ode to the Sabataso Family.

In my post the other day, I spoke about how Vermonters are raised to give a hand without being asked. If anyone in Rutland County exemplifies this notion, it is the Sabataso family.

Let me tell you a little bit about the Sabatasos (some of you avid Express readers already have some insight.) John and Jeri have four wonderful kids; Janice, Jill, Jay, and Jim. All four still live in the area, or live in the area again. If you see even a few of them together, you can tell how close knit of a family they are.

Jim, the youngest of the clan, many of you know as a writer for the Herald. Volunteerism and community certainly run through his veins, currently serving as the Vice President of the Creative Economy board; Director for the non-profit group, Sustainable Rutland; as well as serving on the boards of many other non-profits and committees in Rutland County. He does everything on his plate with an integrity and efficiency that is hard not to admire. Many will hear me refer to him as “the other half of my brain,” because I tend to pick his brain and run ideas by him quite frequently. I am happy to call him one of my closest friends.

As I am sure most locals know, his family owns The Palms Restaurant on Strongs Avenue. His parents, John and Jeri, are two of the nicest people you will ever meet. When I was contemplating the idea of the donation site for Restoring Rutland, I immediately sought Jim out; as he is the “other half of my brain,” and I knew he would have an idea for a space. He suggested the location at 34 Strongs Avenue. I told him that I did not want to impose. He said, “Let me ask,” and about two minutes later, I had been given permission to use the storefront.

That first day, John and Jeri continuously checked on what was happening and if myself or my friend, Alexis Voutas (another amazing friend who stepped up and helped out without being asked), needed anything. They brought us food, they brought us drinks, they even came over and helped us organize, sort, and move boxes. They let us use their trash and cardboard dumpsters. The same was true the next day, and the next. One night, Jim and I were working late at Restoring Rutland. We had been overwhelmed with donations, and were sorting for a long time past our originally scheduled departure time. John and Jeri walked right in and started to sort. Now, this is after having cooked food for multiple days for CVPS workers, making donations themselves, letting us use the building space, and after Jeri worrying that I was going to turn into a piece of pizza and making sure I ate something else.

I have to mention the oldest three kids, as well,; Jill, Janice, and Jay. The girls have made numerous donations and always check on the volunteers to see how we are doing. Their support has been amazing. Jay, has gone above and beyond for Restoring Rutland. He has made sure that timely and urgent supplies get to the Chittenden Fire Department. He has made numerous calls to ensure important medical supplies get to the “island” communities. He has completely transcended any expectations to make sure that Restoring Rutland ran smoothly and that needed supplies made it to those citizens.

Yes, their son Jim stepped up immediately to help me out with Restoring Rutland. But I know that even if Jim weren’t involved as much as he is, or if he weren’t involved in Restoring Rutland at all, his parents would still be the generous, caring, inspiring people that they are. I encourage anyone who donated or helped out with Restoring Rutland, to thank John and Jeri. Not only for the generosity they have demonstrated, but also for raising such an amazing family. Thank the Sabatasos when you see them.

So thank you, Sabatasos. For all you have done, and will surely continue to do, for your community.

This blog post originally appeared on the Vermont Today blog.

 

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